More Troubling Football Injury News

News reports this week confirm the danger of severe long-term brain injury to football players, including those who played in high school and college.  Earlier studies had indicated that boys who start playing tackle football before the age of 12 face a higher risk of neurological deficits as adults.  The American Psychiatric Association reported the […]

Pigoons and Astrocytes

I have piles of fascinating intentions on my desk(s).  Lotsa interesting science news comes by that I’d like to abstract for this blog.  And rarely get to.  This one is unique and too important to be put off.  It’s about human glial cells…and how, when grown in mouse brains, the mice get smarter.   Reminds […]

Whidbey Island Summer School 2015

announcement: Captain Whidbey Inn will again be the site of the 2016 Summer School, August 21-26. I’ve organized over 50 meetings and events, a particular way of learning I enjoy, and the ISTDP Summer School on Whidbey Island, Puget Sound, this year has to rank as my favorite.  We had 21 students (and four teachers) […]

Psychiatry Keeps Moving–New Science, New Thinking

Some recent readings I have come across…demonstrate that conceptual changes are always on the horizon. Two new areas of thinking about depression are emerging from basic and clinical research on brain inflammation and ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist. To my mind, the most revolutionary change concerns brain inflammation and depression. A different direction in biological psychiatry and depression comes from the numerous recent studies pointing to Ketamine’s rapid antidepressant effect.

Just Trying to Think Clearly after Head Injury Can Slow Recovery

Talk about vicious circles: the stress of trying to think clearly can impair the ability to recover clear thinking.  A very strong piece of reporting by Robert Lee Hotz, titled REPERCUSSIONS IN SCHOOL FROM CONCUSSIONS ON THE FIELD, appeared recently in the Wall Street Journal.  Hotz’s investigation confirms that “almost every concussion leaves the brain […]

New tDCS applications and New Yorker article

The New Yorker magazine dated April 6, 2015 has an article on tDCS by Elif Batuman entitled, ELECTRIFIED: adventures in transcranial electrical direct-current stimulation.  As one expects of a New Yorker article it is captivating and clear; it is also relatively short.  Perhaps not so short. About 6,000 words.  I had just finished 10 minutes of […]

Evidence-base for Psychotherapy

A European colleague, Robert Johansson PhD, has called my attention to a very new review (published online March 28, but I don’t know have the address) on the Empirical Status of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy, by Leibsenring et al in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.  My friend says this is a prestigious European journal and sent a pdf, Leichsenring2015ESTreview […]

Oliver Sacks Says Goodbye

Oliver Sacks is rightfully the most renowned physician of our time.  The neurologist is the author of thirteen books including Migraine, Awakenings, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Musicophillia, and a new memoir On The Move. On February 19, 2015 in the NY Times, Sacks announced that he had been diagnosed with […]

SLAVERY’S SHADOW Brochure now available

SLAVERY’S SHADOW: Racism in the American Psyche an all-day program Saturday, February 21, 2015 at NCP.  Public invited. Nationally recognized speakers in the morning, small & large group processing in the afternoon. Space will be limited so reservations suggested.  slavery program Feb 21 brochure Click here or headline for brochure details